The Eurasian Journal of Medicine
Original Article

Vitamin D Level in Laboratory Confirmed COVID-19 and Disease Progression

1.

Applied Physiology Research Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

2.

Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center; and Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department, Health School, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

3.

Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

4.

Heart Failure Research Center,Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

5.

Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

6.

Cancer Prevention Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Omid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

Eurasian J Med 1; 1: -
DOI: 10.5152/eurasianjmed.2022.21088
Read: 381 Downloads: 78 Published: 10 August 2022

Objective: There is no conclusive evidence to suggest vitamin D level can prevent or treat infection with the new coronavirus disease 2019. This study aimed to investigate the effects of serum level of vitamin D in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 on death, severity, and hospitalization duration.

Materials and Methods: Baseline characteristic of patients was extracted from the Isfahan coronavirus disease 2019 registry database (I-CORE). Blood samples were taken from all patients to measure the level of vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) and categorized. The effect of 25(OH) D on death, severity, and hospitalization duration was analyzed by logistic regression.

Results: Among our study patients, 5.5% had a severe deficiency of vitamin D, 23.7% deficiency, and 24.8% insufficiency. Of the 107 patients who died, 7.5% were severely deficient in vitamin D. We found that vitamin D deficiency had no significant effect on death, disease severity, and hospitalization (P > .05). However, having at least one comorbidity increased the odds of death five times after adjusting age > 60 years and gender (P < .0001). The results showed that among all comorbidities, diabetes has the greatest impact on the outcomes as it raised the odds of death, disease severity, and length of hospital stay by 2.23,1.72, and 1.48, respectively, after controlling the age > 60 and gender (P = .0002, P=.08, P=.012).

Conclusions: The mortality, disease severity, and hospitalization of coronavirus disease 2019 patients seem to be not affected by the low levels of 25(OH)D. However, the synergy between vitamin D levels and comorbidities, age, and gender could affect the outcome of coronavirus disease 2019 patients.

Cite this article as: Dana N, Nasirian M, Vaseghi G, et al. Vitamin D level in laboratory confirmed COVID-19 and disease progression. Eurasian J Med 8 August 2022. 10.5152/ eurasianjmed.2022.21088. [Epub Ahead of Print].

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